READY TO GET FIBRE? HERE'S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

READY TO GET FIBRE?
HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

READY TO GET FIBRE?
HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW.

How to get fibre connected at your place.


Connecting to fibre means putting in a brand new fibre optic cable between your place and the street. It can be a bit of a process and there are a few steps in the journey, so here’s the key things you need to think about.

Important decisions

If you’re planning to get fibre installed there are some key decisions you’ll need to make. Here’s the top five things you’ll need to think about.


Do I need to keep my copper line?

Do I need to keep my copper line?

Do I need to keep my copper line?

You can easily run your broadband and home phone over fibre. So you don’t need to keep a copper line. But if you have a medical alarm or security system running through your landline right now, it’s important to make sure these devices still work over fibre. It's important to note that fibre phones won't work if there is a power outage. If you’re unsure, read more about using connected devices over fibre so you can make the right decision for you.

You can easily run your broadband and home phone over fibre. So you don’t need to keep a copper line. But if you have a medical alarm or security system running through your landline right now, it’s important to make sure these devices still work over fibre. It's important to note that fibre phones won't work if there is a power outage. If you’re unsure, read more about using connected devices over fibre so you can make the right decision for you.

You can easily run your broadband and home phone over fibre. So you don’t need to keep a copper line. But if you have a medical alarm or security system running through your landline right now, it’s important to make sure these devices still work over fibre. It's important to note that fibre phones won't work if there is a power outage. If you’re unsure, read more about using connected devices over fibre so you can make the right decision for you.

Where will my cables go?

Where will my cables go?

Where will my cables go?

Your fibre cable will run from the street to your house, but as to how the cable is installed, you’ve got options. Yours could be an aerial cable, an underground pipe, surface cabling and more. Your technician will talk you through this at the first visit, but if you want to be better prepared, read more about different types of cabling options.

Your fibre cable will run from the street to your house, but as to how the cable is installed, you’ve got options. Yours could be an aerial cable, an underground pipe, surface cabling and more. Your technician will talk you through this at the first visit, but if you want to be better prepared, read more about different types of cabling options.

Your fibre cable will run from the street to your house, but as to how the cable is installed, you’ve got options. Yours could be an aerial cable, an underground pipe, surface cabling and more. Your technician will talk you through this at the first visit, but if you want to be better prepared, read more about different types of cabling options.

Do I need consent?

Do I need consent?

Do I need consent?

Getting fibre installed can be a big job, so it’s important to get consent from anyone who might be affected. That might be a neighbour, landlord or owner. Bottom line – if you’re not in charge of your building, you need to get the go-ahead before you get connected. Read more about consents.

Getting fibre installed can be a big job, so it’s important to get consent from anyone who might be affected. That might be a neighbour, landlord or owner. Bottom line – if you’re not in charge of your building, you need to get the go-ahead before you get connected. Read more about consents.

Getting fibre installed can be a big job, so it’s important to get consent from anyone who might be affected. That might be a neighbour, landlord or owner. Bottom line – if you’re not in charge of your building, you need to get the go-ahead before you get connected. Read more about consents.

What happens with internal wiring?

What happens with internal wiring?

What happens with internal wiring?

Fibre comes with some new bits of equipment including something called an ONT. Your technician can talk you through this at install, but it’s worth thinking about where you might put things. Read up on your ONT and other equipment and whether you might need to get integrated wiring.

Fibre comes with some new bits of equipment including something called an ONT. Your technician can talk you through this at install, but it’s worth thinking about where you might put things. Read up on your ONT and other equipment and whether you might need to get integrated wiring.

Fibre comes with some new bits of equipment including something called an ONT. Your technician can talk you through this at install, but it’s worth thinking about where you might put things. Read up on your ONT and other equipment and whether you might need to get integrated wiring.

What plans should I choose?


Fibre has different speeds – and the bigger the number, the higher the speed. Right now there are three different fibre speeds.Fibre 30, Fibre 100 and Fibre 200. Depending on where you live, you may not be able to get every speed – but most people choose the middle one: Fibre 100.

Step by step installation process


There are a few steps in getting fibre set up. The good news is, once you’re done, you’ll be good to go for years.

get consents

Get consents

Consents aren’t needed on most installs, but if they are required, the first step will be for the fibre install company to get permission from your neighbours and the council to lay new cables.

get consents

Scope and agree

An installer will then contact you to arrange a time to drop by. You’ll need to be home for this visit (it takes 1-2 hours), so the installer can talk to you about what’s involved and where you’d like to position the equipment.

get consents

Outside work

The install guys work fast, but it can take some time to design the line and put it in the ground, so we appreciate your patience while they sort this out.

get consents

Get connected

You’ll need to be home when one of the install guys comes back for the last time to get everything up and running.

get consents

Check your alarms

If you have monitored security or medical alarms, it’s a good idea to check they work over the new fibre connection. You can do that by contacting your security or medical alarm installer.

Fibre is worth the wait. Here’s why.

Bye bye buffering

With download speeds up to 10x faster than ADSL, streaming TV and music is ready when you are.


Everyone can jump on at once

Fibre gives you way more bandwidth, which means everyone in your home can be online at once. No problem.


Uploading's a breeze

If you work from home, or use cloud storage you'll love the blistering upload speeds you get from fibre.

Top Fibre questions

You have two options when it comes to a fibre landline. You can get your landline plugged into the fibre equipment at a single location. This keeps things simple and is good for a smaller home, but it does mean your existing phone jacks won’t work any more.

You can also choose integrated wiring, which means connecting up your existing jack points. If you have Sky On Demand or medical alarms plugged in, 'Integrated wiring' is the best option for you.

It’s also important to note that your landline over fibre runs on electricity. So it’s a good idea to have a mobile handy in case of power outages.

Getting Fibre installed can be a complicated process. In an ideal world it only takes a few weeks, but it can take a lot longer. Your delay might be down to one thing or a few, so here’s a breakdown of where things can get held up.

One of the delays right now is simply volume. Thousands of New Zealanders have ordered fibre, which is great, and your LFC and us are working hard to get everyone connected. If you’re already in the queue, you don’t need to do a thing. Your LFC will get in touch when you’re next on the list. We know that waiting can be a pain, and we’re doing everything we can to speed things up our end.

A delay in your fibre connection can often happen around consent. Not all properties need consent – so check that out with your LFC first. If you do need consent, it means getting other people involved and can slow things down. You can speed things up by talking to your neighbours or landlord and making sure they send off those consent forms super fast.

Depending on your home or business, your install options could be an aerial cable, underground pipe, fence, driveway, retaining wall or buried under the garden or pathway. Some options take a bit longer than others – and if you’ve got a tricky cable install, your connection time may be pushed back a bit. Read more about installing your fibre cable.

If you chose integrated wiring it means the install team will need to connect your new fibre cable with all the existing phone jack points at your place. That means you can keep using your extra phones, medical alarms and other devices – but it does take a bit longer. If you do have a medical alarm, make sure you get in touch with the manufacturer to check it’ll work on fibre. Read more about the ins and outs of integrated wiring.

Spark looks after data over fibre lines, but we don't install the lines themselves. If you like, we run the high-speed trains, but someone else needs to put down the tracks.
Every house is different. Your connection team will estimate as close as they can. But if someone has a particularly tricky section or they don’t have the necessary consents it can take longer. A couple of those in a row and it pushes the whole queue back.
Integrated wiring isn’t as complicated as it sounds. It just means that your new fibre cable can be hooked up to all your existing phone jackpoints so you can keep using them. So if you have extra phones, medical alarms, a security system or services like Sky TV, it’s probably a good option for you. But it’s important to let us know you want integrated wiring when you order or it could cost you big dollars later.

If you live or work down a shared driveway or in an apartment or multi-storey building, you’ll need to get consent before you can get fibre installed. If you’re renting your place, you’ll also need consent from the landlord or owner.

Your LFC sends out consent letters to the building owner, body corporate, or your neighbours before getting started on any work. So the time it takes from order to connection depends on how fast they consent to the install. You can speed that up by popping over for a chat and letting them know it doesn’t cost a cent and can even bump up the property value. We’ve got some info to help you with the consents process.

Before you get connected, there are a few important decisions you'll need to make including wiring in your home, installing the cable, where you put your equipment and whether you should ditch your copper line. Your technician can talk you through your options during the first visit. If the above page hasn't answered your questions, or if you're after more detail, please visit our Fibre Help Centre.